Struggling with POTS

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One of the conditions that I’ve been dealing with—that I don’t often talk about—is known as Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, and it frequently co-occurs with the type of connective tissue disorder that I have. What this “syndrome” means is that, though I usually have a healthy resting pulse, when I stand it increases, often dramatically so. The effects that this can have and the list of symptoms that it causes seems near endless—and while my POTS isn’t as debilitating as it is for others, it does make an already difficult disorder sometimes seem an even more monumental task to cope with.

As an example, here is an incomplete overview from Wikipedia on just some of the most common symptoms:
• palpitations
• light-headedness
• chest discomfort
• shortness of breath
• weakness or “heaviness” in the lower legs
• blurred vision
• headache
• decreased concentration
• mental clouding
• extreme fatigue
• nausea
• near-syncope
• difficulty sleeping
• fluctuations in weight, memory
• pallor, or sweating

I experience every single one of those effects—most of them on a daily, continuous basis. And, this is despite the fact that I’m on a high dose of another difficult medication to control it. The medication itself also causes it’s own problems. While it does lessen the amount that my heart rate rises upon standing, it also causes my already low-normal blood pressure to fall quickly—and dramatically—along with it. This, ironically, also causes many of the same symptoms I’m on the medication to treat in the first place. Despite this, the medication seems necessary for the time being because, while it doesn’t prevent a large increase in my heart rate entirely, it does keep it from going as high as it often did without—and prolonged tachycardia (of any kind) can be hard on the heart, particularly with my disorder.

POTS is also a difficult disorder to navigate, as symptoms may be exacerbated with things like: “prolonged sitting, prolonged standing, alcohol, heat, exercise, or eating a large meal“. I seem to have to tip toe around it in order to help keep it controlled, but frustratingly, the path that I need to take to do so often conflicts with the things I’m supposed to do to minimize the effects of some of my other health issues. For instance, nearly every recommendation for helping someone with POTS (like increased salt and fluid intake), is the opposite of what I’m supposed to do to help stabilize my intracranial pressure.

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This was my pulse and blood pressure while sitting down.

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And this was my pulse and blood pressure shortly after, while standing up. My heart rate increased greatly, while my blood pressure fell just as much.

This can be a frightening thing to live with—the possibility of it’s effects worsening, hanging always over your head. That’s something that can be hard to ignore when you’re dealing with such prominent (and at times all-consuming) symptoms. I know that on the whole I’m lucky. I can still walk around normally without a wheelchair and haven’t begun to lose consciousness whenever I stand. That’s something that I absolutely know to appreciate with this syndrome. But—at the same time—dealing with all of the other ways it’s effecting my quality of life on top of a debilitating disorder can be difficult, and exhausting.