Marfact #25 + My lens journey: Part 4

In honor of Marfan Syndrome awareness month, here’s today’s Marfact (provided by the wonderful Marfan Foundation).

Marfact #25: People with Marfan syndrome should be treated by a physician familiar with the condition and how it affects all body systems. Careful management includes an annual echocardiogram to monitor the size and function of the heart and aorta; an initial eye exam by an ophthalmologist, including a slit‐lamp exam, with periodic follow up exams; careful monitoring of the skeletal system by an orthopedist, especially during childhood and adolescence; medications such as beta‐blockers to lower blood pressure and, consequently, reduce stress on the aorta; and lifestyle adaptations to reduce stress on the aorta.

Visit www.marfan.org for more information.

118359

My lens journey part 4:

Part 3

The healing process from the last surgery to re-attach my left lens implant was painful and slow going thanks to the complications that occurred. It was only 3 months later and a few weeks into December of that same year when I noticed a worrisome ring forming around the vision in my right eye. I was pretty sure that this was the lens but my optometrist said everything looked fine for the moment. Regardless of how it looked on exam, I knew that something was wrong and after a few days of the ring continually increasing in length and thickness it became obvious. I bent forward to get a pair of pajamas out of my dresser drawer and my entire lens slid forward into the front of my eye.

This was different than the last time one of my lens implants dislocated in that it happened gradually and was still holding on to some extent. The last time it had happened instantly and it wasn’t hanging on at all. My surgeon again wasn’t available for a week, so this was another long week of sleeping upright and worrying about what I was about face. Only this time I had every reason to worry, after all of the things I had gone through during the last two surgeries and everything that followed. I had just lost the vision in my remaining “good” eye and I was looking at what could be another horribly painful, complicated surgery with months of healing time. I was afraid that the vision in this eye would turn out as poorly as the vision in my left eye had or worse.

I held onto the hope that because 4 of my 6 previous surgeries had gone perfectly that this one likely would too, despite how the last two turned out. After all, the odds were technically in my favor. The surgeon decided to re-attach my lens as he had done during the previous 2 operations and before I knew it I was being wheeled into the OR again. The first thing I remember after waking up from the surgery is being in tremendous pain. Because of this I was kept in the recovery room far longer than I’ve ever needed to be and the nurses would return every five minutes to administer more pain meds in order to try to get the pain under control – which was largely unsuccessful. After about an hour of this they wheeled me back to the holding area. I remember laying curled up in a ball on the bed clenching my fists and waiting for them to bring my mom in – sometimes a girl just needs her mom.

It was a long time before they finally brought her in and they still hadn’t been able to get my pain under control, though not for lack of trying. I was told that my eye had hemorrhaged again and that there was severe inflammation – just like last time. The pain was really intense and on top of that it’s not uncommon for people in my family – especially my mom and I – to not respond very well to pain medications (or local anesthetics) to begin with. Eventually I just started vomiting uncontrollably from all of the pain medications, the violence of which did not feel good on my eye. Eventually, because nothing they did was helping much and all I wanted to do was go back to the hotel and curl up in bed, the nurses agreed to let me go home. All in all I was in the hospital for 9 hours after this surgery, instead of the usually 2.

The recovery for this surgery was by far the longest I had ever experienced. It took well over 6 months before my vision had healed to the full extent that it would and the pain had largely and finally subsided. Sadly, my vision never recovered to what it had been before the surgery. While I thankfully don’t have floppy iris or double vision in my right eye, my visual acuity as a whole was largely reduced and my distance eye can no longer see distances very well at all. It’s been hard to get used to and it’s been a very long and frustrating journey.

I miss things the way they were and it’s been hard to adjust to not seeing the world as well as I had all those years. But, as hard as it’s been to cope with these changes, it’s these experiences that have also renewed in me a feeling of appreciation and gratefulness for the vision that I do have. I’ve been reminded that nothing is guaranteed, and that’s something I’ll always hold on to.

12 thoughts on “Marfact #25 + My lens journey: Part 4

  1. Reblogged this on sondasmcschatter and commented:
    QUOTE”: I miss things the way they were and it’s been hard to adjust to not seeing the world as well as I had all those years. But, as hard as it’s been to cope with these changes, it’s these experiences that have also renewed in me a feeling of appreciation and gratefulness for the vision that I do have. I’ve been reminded that nothing is guaranteed, and that’s something I’ll always hold on to.”

    NO MATTER WHAT OUR HEALTH PROBLEMS ARE–I THINK WE ALL HAVE AN APPRECIATION & FEEL GRATEFUL FOR WHAT WE STILL ARE ABLE TO DO IN OUR LIVES!!! THANKS FOR SHARING & EDUCATING US ABOUT YOUR HEALTH PROBLEMS!!! THE MORE WE SHARE ABOUT DIFFERENT HEALTH PROBLEMS — THE BETTER WE ALL ARE OF HAVING AN UNDERSTANDING & COMPASSION FOR OTHERS!! AND ALSO ABLE TO SHARE HOPE!!!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Marfact #23 and 24 + My lens journey: Part 3 | Tissue Tales

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s