Marfact #21 and 22 + My lens journey: Part 2

In honor of Marfan Syndrome awareness month, here’s today’s Marfact (provided by the wonderful Marfan Foundation).

Marfact #21: People with Marfan syndrome are at an up to 250 times greater risk of aortic dissection than the general population.

Marfact #22: Marfan syndrome can affect many parts of the body, but has “variable expression,” so each person is affected differently, even in the same family. While there are features that are frequently seen in many people with the disorder (such as tall, thin stature, disproportionately long arms and legs), not all people exhibit these features.

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I’m actually going to be splitting this into 4 parts because of how long it actually is once I sit down to write it.

Part 1

About a week after my 16th birthday my life changed – and I will never mean this more literally – in the blink of an eye. Meaning that I blinked and all of a sudden the vision in my left eye was entirely blurry. I knew what had happened immediately: my vision was identical to when I had no lenses at all and would take off my glasses. My implant had dislocated and I was devastated. At the time we had been told that should anything ever happen to my lens implants that they would likely have to be removed and that would be that.

My eye surgeon wasn’t available for a week, and because of the risk of my lens implant lodging in my pupil and causing serious problems I had to spend that entire week sleeping practically upright to keep it from doing so. This coupled with thinking that I had just lost one of the most precious things I had, made it a pretty long and melancholy 7 days. To my enormous relief though, my eye surgeon decided to re-attach my lens instead of removing it. I wish that had been the end of it, but it wasn’t.

My eye healed quickly and very minimally painful as they always have, but once my vision began to come back I noticed that every time I moved my eye everything in my field of vision would bounce. Mom and I left Vancouver and made the 8 hour trip home hoping that as my eye continued to heal this would go away, but it didn’t. I went to my local optometrist for a post operative check and was told that the cause of the bouncy vision was “Floppy Iris Syndrome”. As far as he could tell my lens implant was reattached further back this time to help keep it from rubbing on my iris as it had before, but now it was too far back and not supporting my iris at all, causing it to “flop”.

6th Eye Surgery

My eyes a month and a half after surgery #5 and a day before surgery #6.

So, about a month and a half after surgery #5 – my eye red and still not fully healed – we headed back to Vancouver for another operation. This time it was decided that he would replace my lens entirely with a new one (a bigger and riskier surgery) and for the first time ever before an operation I felt dread. I was hoping that because he would be replacing my lens this time that things would be better but when I woke up my mom told me that it had been decided during surgery that my old lens would be reattached instead of replaced as it had last time. Aside from that, right away things felt different this time when I woke up than it ever had after the previous surgeries. And though it wasn’t unmanageable, my pain level was a lot higher than it had ever been following eye surgery.

It was the day after though, that I ended up going through one of the hardest things I’ve ever been through.

2 thoughts on “Marfact #21 and 22 + My lens journey: Part 2

  1. Pingback: Marfact #20 + My lens journey: Part 1 | Tissue Tales

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